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401 23rd St., Suite 202
Glenwood Springs, CO 81601
970-945-8753 Phone
970-945-4970 Fax

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Emergency Info

Tooth Ache

Begin by cleaning around the sore tooth meticulously. Using warm salt water, rinse the mouth to displace any food trapped between teeth. Under no circumstances should you use aspirin on the aching tooth or on the gum. In the event of facial swelling, apply a cold compress to the area. For temporary pain relief, acetaminophen is recommended. Please contact us for an appointment if the pain persists more than a day.

Cut or Bitten Tongue, Lip or Cheek

Ice can be applied to any bruised areas. For bleeding, apply firm (but gentle) pressure with sterile gauze or a clean cloth. If the bleeding does not stop with pressure or continues after 15 minutes, go to an emergency room.

Broken Tooth

Rinse the area with warm water. Put a cold compress over the facial area of the injury. Recover any broken tooth fragments. Seek immediate dental attention.

Knocked Out Permanent Tooth

Recover the tooth, making sure to hold it by the crown (top) and not the root. Rinse, but do not clean or handle the tooth more than necessary. Reinsert the tooth in the socket, and hold it in place using a clean piece of gauze or cloth. If the tooth cannot be reinserted, carry it in a cup containing milk or water. Because time is essential, see a dentist immediately.

For a fractured tooth, it is best to rinse with warm water and again, apply a cold pack or compress. Ibuprofen may be used to help keep down swelling. If the tooth fracture is minor, the tooth can be smoothed & polished if necessary, restored by the dentist if the pulp is not severely damaged. For a displaced tooth try to first recover the tooth, making sure to hold it by the crown (top) and not the root end. Rinse, but do no clean or handle the tooth any more than necessary. Reinsert the tooth in the socket of the mouth and hold it in place using a clean piece of gauze or cloth. If the tooth cannot be reinserted, carry it in a cup containing milk, saline, victim’s own saliva or water. Because time is essential, see a dentist immediately

Possible Broken Jaw

In the event of jaw injury, try to secure the mouth closed with a handkerchief or towel wrapped around the top of the head and the bottom of the jaw. Go immediately to the emergency room. The hospital will contact the oral surgeon.

Bleeding After a Baby Tooth Falls Out

Fold a piece of gauze and place it (tightly) over the bleeding area. Bite down on the gauze for 15 minutes. If bleeding continues, see a dentist.

Cold or Canker Sores

Canker Sores are caused by an overgrowth of a normal bacteria within your mouth.  Eating Citrus, Chocolate or acidic foods can aggrevate canker sores.  They are often precipitated by truama or stress to the tissue.  Over-the counter medications will usually provide temporary relief. If sores persist visit your dentist. The following products may be useful:

  • Lysine, Abreva, Releev for Cold sores
  • Canker-X, Anbesol, Zilactin- B, Canker Cover for Canker sores

Pain Management

Pain can occur in any number of places in your mouth: teeth, gums, roots, the palate, tongue and jaw. Cavities are a common culprit causing pain. Untreated cavities can impact nerves because of infections of the tooth and gums. Impacted and abscessed teeth and sore jaws from teeth grinding are other common causes of pain.

Improper bite relationships and jaw disorders can also cause pain. Other sources of pain include sleep disorders, and headaches and neck aches.

Special splints can sometimes be applied to stabilize a bite. Bites can also be corrected with special orthodontic procedures, appliances and restoration techniques.

There are many methods for relieving oral pain. They include:

  • Ice packs on the affected area.
  • Avoiding hard candy or ice.
  • Avoiding sleeping on your stomach.

Dentists use a wide array of pain management tools, including:

  • Anesthetics such as Novocaine.
  • Analgesics such as aspirin/Tylenol or ibuprofen.

Anesthetic is utilized with most restorative and all surgical procedures to help the patient avoid discomfort during the procedure, but post-operatively as well.